Cosmetic Dentistry for Your Family

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By Timothy T. Bui, D.D.S., Inc.
September 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay  
NewAdvancesCouldRevolutionizeDecayTreatment

The basics for treating tooth decay have changed little since the father of modern dentistry Dr. G.V. Black developed them in the early 20th Century. Even though technical advances have streamlined treatment, our objectives are the same: remove any decayed material, prepare the cavity and then fill it.

This approach has endured because it works—dentists practicing it have preserved billions of teeth. But it has had one principle drawback: we often lose healthy tooth structure while removing decay. Although we preserve the tooth, its overall structure may be weaker.

But thanks to recent diagnostic and treatment advances we’re now preserving more of the tooth structure during treatment than ever before. On the diagnostic front enhanced x-ray technology and new magnification techniques are helping us find decay earlier when there’s less damaged material to remove and less risk to healthy structure.

Treating cavities has likewise improved with the increased use of air abrasion, an alternative to drilling. Emitting a concentrated stream of fine abrasive particles, air abrasion is mostly limited to treating small cavities. Even so, dentists using it say they’re removing less healthy tooth structure than with drilling.

While these current advances have already had a noticeable impact on decay treatment, there’s more to come. One in particular could dwarf every other advance with its impact: a tooth repairing itself through dentin regeneration.

This futuristic idea stems from a discovery by researchers at King’s College, London experimenting with Tideglusib, a medication for treating Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers placed tiny sponges soaked with the drug into holes drilled into mouse teeth. After a few weeks the holes had filled with dentin, produced by the teeth themselves.

Dentin regeneration isn’t new, but methods to date haven’t been able to produce enough dentin to repair a typical cavity. Tideglusib has proven more promising, and it’s already being used in clinical trials. If its development continues to progress, patients’ teeth may one day repair their own cavities without a filling.

Dr. Black’s enduring concepts continue to define tooth decay treatment. But developments now and on the horizon are transforming how we treat this disease in ways the father of modern dentistry couldn’t imagine.

If you would like more information on dental treatments for tooth decay, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Timothy T. Bui, D.D.S., Inc.
September 10, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: teeth whitening  
3QuestionsYouShouldAskbeforeUndergoingTeethWhitening

There are a number of teeth whitening options to put the brightness back into your smile — from professional dentist office applications to over-the-counter products for home use. But before you decide on an option, you should first consider whether whitening is right for you and to what extent.

Here are 3 questions to ask yourself — and us — before undergoing a whitening treatment.

Do I have any dental problems that make whitening problematic? The underlying cause of the staining may stem from decay, root canal problems or other dental issues; in these cases the underlying cause needs to be treated first, because whitening would only mask the actual problem. You also may not want to whiten your teeth for aesthetic reasons: people with certain features like short teeth or gummy smiles may find these features become more prominent after teeth whitening. It might be more advisable in these cases to consider other cosmetic options first.

How much whitening do I really need to improve my smile? One of the biggest myths about teeth whitening is the brighter the shade the more attractive the smile. A truly attractive tooth color, however, is more nuanced, and every person’s ideal color is different. The most attractive and natural color is one that matches the whites of your eyes.

What effect will whitening have on existing dental work I already have? In most cases, none — and that could be a problem. Composite resins or ceramic dental material have their color “baked in” and bleaching chemicals used in whitening have no effect on them. The concern then is whether whitening nearby natural teeth may produce a color mismatch between them and the dental restorations, resulting in an unattractive appearance.

Before you decide on teeth whitening, visit us first for a complete exam and consultation. We’ll discuss whether whitening is a good option for you, or whether there are other issues we should address first. We can also advise you on products and techniques, and how to get the most from your whitening experience.

If you would like more information on teeth whitening, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Important Teeth Whitening Questions…Answered!

By Timothy T. Bui, D.D.S., Inc.
August 31, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
AToothlessTiger

Let’s say you’re traveling to Italy to surprise your girlfriend, who is competing in an alpine ski race… and when you lower the scarf that’s covering your face, you reveal to the assembled paparazzi that one of your front teeth is missing. What will you do about this dental dilemma?

Sound far-fetched? It recently happened to one of the most recognized figures in sports — Tiger Woods. There’s still some uncertainty about exactly how this tooth was taken out: Was it a collision with a cameraman, as Woods’ agent reported… or did Woods already have some problems with the tooth, as others have speculated? We still don’t know for sure, but the big question is: What happens next?

Fortunately, contemporary dentistry offers several good solutions for the problem of missing teeth. Which one is best? It depends on each individual’s particular situation.

Let’s say that the visible part of the tooth (the crown) has been damaged by a dental trauma (such as a collision or a blow to the face), but the tooth still has healthy roots. In this case, it’s often possible to keep the roots and replace the tooth above the gum line with a crown restoration (also called a cap). Crowns are generally made to order in a dental lab, and are placed on a prepared tooth in a procedure that requires two office visits: one to prepare the tooth for restoration and to make a model of the mouth and the second to place the custom-manufactured crown and complete the restoration. However, in some cases, crowns can be made on special machinery right in the dental office, and placed during the same visit.

But what happens if the root isn’t viable — for example, if the tooth is deeply fractured, or completely knocked out and unable to be successfully re-implanted?

In that case, a dental implant is probably the best option for tooth replacement. An implant consists of a screw-like post of titanium metal that is inserted into the jawbone during a minor surgical procedure. Titanium has a unique property: It can fuse with living bone tissue, allowing it to act as a secure anchor for the replacement tooth system. The crown of the implant is similar to the one mentioned above, except that it’s made to attach to the titanium implant instead of the natural tooth.

Dental implants look, function and “feel” just like natural teeth — and with proper care, they can last a lifetime. Although they may be initially expensive, their quality and longevity makes them a good value over the long term. A less-costly alternative is traditional bridgework — but this method requires some dental work on the adjacent, healthy teeth; plus, it isn’t expected to last as long as an implant, and it may make the teeth more prone to problems down the road.

What will the acclaimed golfer do? No doubt Tiger’s dentist will help him make the right tooth-replacement decision.

If you have a gap in your grin — whatever the cause — contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation, and find out which tooth-replacement system is right for you. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Timothy T. Bui, D.D.S., Inc.
August 27, 2018
Tags: dental implants  

Dental ImplantsAre the gaps in your smile causing your self-esteem to plummet or making chewing harder than it should be? If so, you could benefit from dental implants to replace your missing teeth. Restoring your smile has never been easier, but understanding how this procedure works and what to expect from it is crucial in ensuring that it is the best treatment for you. Find out more about dental implants with Dr. Timothy Bui and Dr. Caden Lim at locations in Newport Beach, CA, and Garden Grove, CA.

What is a dental implant? 
Dental implants are a step apart from other tooth replacement options like dental bridges or dentures. Rather than only replacing a tooth and filling the gap in your smile, an implant replaces the tooth’s root as well, stimulating the bone under the gap the same way a natural tooth would and stopping bone atrophy in its tracks. The root replacement design also allows your new tooth to function exactly as your natural teeth.

Parts of a Dental Implant 
The crown itself has three main components: the fixture, the abutment, and the prosthetic. The implant’s fixture is a screw-like post made of titanium which your dentist implants directly into the bone under your missing tooth. During the healing process, the bone grows around the fixture, anchoring it into place and ensuring that your replacement prosthetic tooth, held in place on the fixture by the abutment, has a solid foundation on which to sit for many years to come.

The Benefits of Dental Implants in Newport Beach, CA, and Garden Grove, CA
Dental implants’ most obvious benefit is the full, beautiful smile they provide. However, they also have other, unseen benefits that could potentially save your smile from serious dental complications. Implants stimulate the jawbone to prevent bone atrophy, a process where the bone breaks down and degrades due to lack of use. Additionally, implants do not require any extra steps in your daily oral care routine. Simply brush twice a day and floss your teeth as you would normally to keep implants clean and healthy.

For more information on dental implants, please contact Dr. Timothy Bui and Dr. Caden Lim at locations in Newport Beach, CA, and Garden Grove, CA. Call (949) 675-7750 to schedule your appointment at the Newport Beach location or (714) 537-0550 to schedule your appointment at the Garden Grove location today!

By Timothy T. Bui, D.D.S., Inc.
August 21, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tmj disorders  
WhytheTreatmentModelforYourJawJointDisorderMatters

Your temporomandibular joints (TMJ), located where your lower jaw meets the skull, play an essential role in nearly every mouth function. It’s nearly impossible to eat or speak without them.

Likewise, jaw joint disorders (temporomandibular joint disorders or TMD) can make your life miserable. Not only can you experience extreme discomfort or pain, your ability to eat certain foods or speak clearly could be impaired.

But don’t assume you have TMD if you have these and other symptoms — there are other conditions with similar symptoms. You’ll need a definitive diagnosis of TMD from a qualified physician or dentist, particularly one who’s completed post-graduate programs in Oral Medicine or Orofacial Pain, before considering treatment.

If you are diagnosed with TMD, you may then face treatment choices that emanate from one of two models: one is an older dental model based on theories that the joint and muscle dysfunction is mainly caused by poor bites or other dental problems. This model encourages treatments like orthodontically moving teeth, crowning problem teeth or adjusting bites by grinding down tooth surfaces.

A newer treatment model, though, has supplanted this older one and is now practiced by the majority of dentists. This is a medical model that views TMJs like any other joint in the body, and thus subject to the same sort of orthopedic problems found elsewhere: sore muscles, inflamed joints, strained tendons and ligaments, and disk problems. Treatments tend to be less invasive or irreversible than those from the dental model.

The newer model encourages treatments like physical therapy, medication, occlusive guards or stress management. The American Association of Dental Research (AADR) in fact recommends that TMD patients begin their treatment from the medical model rather than the dental one, unless there are indications to the contrary. Many studies have concluded that a majority of patients gain significant relief with these types of therapies.

If a physician or dentist recommends more invasive treatment, particularly surgery, consider seeking a second opinion. Unlike the therapies mentioned above, surgical treatments have a spotty record when it comes to effectiveness — some patients even report their conditions worsening afterward. Try the less-invasive approach first — you may find improvement in your symptoms and quality of life.

If you would like more information on treating TMD, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Seeking Relief from TMD.”





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